Tag Archives: training

Profile of a Farm Shop Demonstration Farmer: James Mugo

Naomi Mungai
August 30, 2015
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An opportunity with the Farm Shop Trust turned James Mugo into a successful Farmer keen to expand his farming business

I (James Mugo) was born and raised in Gikambura area, before I joined Farm shop I had little interest in farming. One day in May 2014 on my way to Gikambura shopping centre , there was a farming seminar taking place I came to learn later that it was farm shop Gikambura shop launch. I joined the group that was being trained about maize production. After the seminar, through the knowledge gained that day and seeds obtained from the training I planted maize variety Duma 43 and the resulting yields were good.

Maize plants growing near Ngecha, Kenya
Maize plants growing near Ngecha, Kenya

Later on we held discussions with a Farm Shop Trust agronomist in the follow-up trainings and we planted kales and spinach with the correct spacing and used Mavuno fertilizer. Since then, my farm has since been used as a demonstration farm where farmers are trained on the current technology in agriculture. Currently my farm has spinach and African Nightshade( managu). Other plants in my nursery are kale and peppers.

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From my association with Farm shop I have added to my knowledge on how to choose the right variety of maize seed depending on the different seasons. I have also gained knowledge on the use of fertilizer; the importance of mixing the fertilizer with soil before planting to avoid scorching and the need to use the right fertilizer for each plant.

I have also learnt about keeping records, how to use chemicals for pest control and benefits of mulching to retain soil moisture. I can now say that I have a lot of interest and passion in farming and getting small sales from the kale and spinach has been my joy.

Spinach plants growing in Ngecha
Spinach plants growing in Ngecha

I am excited to continue my association with Farm shop for more knowledge and education. My area (Gikambura) is dry and my dream in future is to have a drip irrigation system complete with a tank so as to expand my farming business.

 

This farmer profile has been written by Naomi Mungai. Please contact me at naomi.mungai@farmshop.co.ke if you have any questions about becoming a demonstration farmer with Farm Shop.


Maize farming demonstrations with the Farm Shop Trust near Ngecha, Kenya

Amber Strong
August 20, 2015
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Myself and my colleagues, Morwenna Roberts and Claire Reigate joined Farm Shop Trust Extension Officers (in agronomy and livestock health) Naomi and Casty to give demonstration training at a farm near Ngecha. I first visited the demonstration farm in Ngecha on the 22nd of July and fifteen farmers attended. We were joined by Rosemary from the Ministry of Agriculture, and Beatrice from Farm Concern, an NGO that links farmers to market traders.

Farmers look on at the Maize planting demonstration near Ngecha
Farmers look on at the Maize planting demonstration near Ngecha

The Farm Shop Trust provides regular agricultural training days for farmers at locations across Kiambu County, Kenya. If farmers are educated on how best to farm a wide variety of crops they are more likely to produce higher yields, farm more efficiently and sustainably on the land available to them and be able to sell their produce for higher prices. Farming is the backbone of the Kenyan economy and training in efficient smallholder farming methods will help more people to thrive.

Farmers look on at the Maize planting demonstration near Ngecha
Farmers look on at the Maize planting demonstration near Ngecha

Farm Shop Trust staff led instruction for a group of fifteen local farmers on how to measure out the correct distances needed between maize seeds; how deep to make the holes and how to use the fertiliser correctly so that the seeds are not burnt by it. The training was based around using a fertiliser product, and planting F1 Hybrid Maize. The farmers pegged out the row, then used bits of plastic tied to the wire to mark out the 25 cm spacing, then dug a hole, put in 3 container caps full of fertiliser, covered it in a bit of soil then added the maize seed and covered the hole completely. They repeated this for 2 rows, then planted a row of maize without fertilizer so that the farmers can compare the difference.

Maize rows are measured out at the demonstration farm near Ngecha
Maize rows are measured out at the demonstration farm near Ngecha

At the end of the session farmers were asked to fill out feedback forms and identify areas in which they would like further training. Farmers requested instruction in dairy and poultry production, specifically calf rearing. Rearing animals for milk, meat and eggs would involve high initial investment by farmers, and continual cost of inputs for the maintenance of animal health, though promising higher profit margins.

Cows at the demonstration farm near Ngecha
Cows at the demonstration farm near Ngecha

I visited Ngecha again with Morwenna Roberts and Casty on the 12th of August, twenty-one days after the seeds were planted. When we arrived at the Demo field we saw that the maize seeds had successfully sprouted and grown to around seven inches in height.

Maize seedlings at three weeks old
Maize seedlings at three weeks old

The Farm Shop Trust had also previously instructed the demo farmer to plant pepper plant seeds and cover the patch with feed bags to protect the germinating seeds from the morning cold. When we removed the feed bags on the 12th of August the pepper plant seeds had sprouted successfully and in four weeks the farmer will transplant the seedlings so that the plants have space to grow and that he can sell some of the plants.

Morwenna Roberts and the demonstration farmer pick weeds from between pepper plant seedlings
Morwenna Roberts and the demonstration farmer pick weeds from between pepper plant seedlings

We then drove to a near-by tomato greenhouse where this group of farmers regularly meet and Casty reviewed what had been done three weeks ago and that this had resulted in plenty of healthy maize seedlings. Casty then handed out pens and paper to the ten farmers attending the training and gave a lesson on the importance of record keeping in farming because it enables the farmer to record exactly what they did. Farmers were instructed to record for livestock; symptoms of their sick animal, how long the animal had had those symptoms, what they had treated the animal with, how strong a dose they used and what the results where. For crops, they were taught to record the date of planting, spacing of planting, if fertiliser was used and if so, how it had been prepared. These habits were recommended so that if a farmer had a healthy crop they knew what they should do again next time and if the was a problem they had a better chance of identifying what had gone wrong.

Farmers attending the second demonstration day at Ngecha
Farmers attending the second demonstration day at Ngecha

After this lesson there was a group Q and A session where the farmers explained the current crop or livestock difficulties they were experiencing ad Casty explained the changes or treatments they needed to make. Casty explained de-worming procedures, how to identify Trichominiasis in cows and how to deter pests on tomato plants with either pesticides or diluted rabbit urine.

Farm Shop Agricultural Extension Officer Naomi, leading the Q and A session
Farm Shop Agricultural Extension Officer Naomi, leading the Q and A session

Farmers left with practical advice on the current agricultural problems they were facing. If farmers do well and make more profit they are more likely to be able to afford more than the most basic and cheapest agricultural products.

 

 

If you would like to know more about Plymouth University’s work with the Farm Shop Trust in Kenya please feel free to contact me at amber.strong@plymouth.ac.uk

Amber Strong -Network Advisor in Entrepreneurship
Amber Strong -Network Advisor in Entrepreneurship